How Can A Collaborative Divorce Help Your Children Through Your Divorce?

Little girl with arms around little boy.Getting a divorce is never easy, especially when children are involved!

When you choose the collaborative divorce process, it encompasses everyone’s wellbeing and works with the family as a whole. It doesn’t pit spouses against each other. Its goal is to learn to communicate with each person and mediate an amicable agreement for each spouse.

This process works as a team model, employing lawyers, mediators, divorce coaches, financial neutrals, child life specialists and psychologists — everyone on the team, including the couple, vow to resolve issues without going to court.

There are many ways the collaborative divorce process is pro-family and pro-child. Here are a few:

  • Children are priority #1 in the decision-making process
  • When the child sees their parents working together, the children have a healthier emotional outcome
  • Child life specialist and psychologist work with your children to process the separation and deal with the emotions that arise
  • Team members help encourage discussions to keep the process moving forward
  • Can help develop co-parenting plans such as future visitation, vacation and holiday plans

The collaborative divorce process is not a scorched earth model. It is more collaborative than contentious. By encouraging communication, the walls come down, and the family unit can move forward healthily.

The collaborative divorce process is an alternative dispute resolution method that can help you maintain your family unit while staying away from court litigation.

Our team of experts can help you and your spouse to develop a dialogue that will shield your children from the raw emotion that divorce brings.

At Peace Talks, our custody mediation and parenting plan mediation services assist divorced, divorcing, and never-married parents in working together to develop a child-centered custody plan and improve your ability to co-parent.

Contact us today to see how we can help both you and your spouse divorce in a way the keeps your family unit intact.

Note: This information is general in nature and should not be construed as legal/financial/tax/or medical advice. You should work with your attorney, financial, medical or tax professional to determine what will work best for your situation.

Tips on How to Tell Your Children You Are Getting a Divorce

couple walking in the woods with their 2 children

One of the hardest moments in a divorce is sharing with your children that you and your spouse will be separating. It’s so hard to know how to start and have such an awkward conversation.

Here are some tips we like to share with our clients to help them in having this painful dialogue:

  • Make sure you are 100% sure that a divorce will be occurring prior to telling your children
  • Weekend mornings are a good time
  • The age of your children will determine how much detail will be shared
    • Keep it simple
    • Stay away from inappropriate information
  • Every family member should be present, including both parents
  • Keep a unified front
  • Let them know how much you love them and your divorce is not their fault and that you both are happy they were born
  • Share with them that you are still a family, just restructured
  • Let them know some of the future plans involving your divorce
  • Share with them that they will be living in two homes and will still see both of you regularly

Often in our lives, we are faced with life-altering conversations, and more often than not, it won’t be black & white, it will be various shades of gray. This talk will not be a one and done, it will be an ongoing and evolving dialogue.

Our team of experts can help you and your spouse to develop a dialogue that will shield your children from the raw emotion that divorce brings.

At Peace Talks Mediation Services, our custody mediation and parenting plan mediation services assist divorced, divorcing, and never-married parents in working together to develop a child-centered custody plan and improve your ability to co-parent.

Contact us today to see how we can help you and your spouse handle this life-changing conversation.

Note: This information is general in nature and should not be construed as legal/financial/tax advice. You should work with your attorney, financial, or tax professional to determine what will work best for your situation.