Post Divorce Portfolio Balancing Act

All investors review their investments annually, and in light of the market’s recent volatility, it would be wise to review your investments soon as the new tax laws may affect your strategies. “Rebalancing” may be in order if your portfolio’s asset allocation no longer meets your current long-term objectives.As always, you should consult with your tax preparer and financial advisor to ensure that whatever changes have occurred in your life are reflected in your fiduciary’s overall plan.

It’s easy to see why PeaceTalks relies on the teamwork dynamic of involving tax and investment specialists in all our mediations. From the start couples build individual strategies as the assets are divided until a settlement agreement is reached and they sign off to their mutual satisfaction. We refer people, when necessary, from our group of trusted associates and we work seamlessly with whomever a client trusts.

The following has been excerpted from and article in The Press-Enterprise by Terry Parker. Look over these ideas and see if something might aid you in your preparation and planning. If you have a question please contact the office anytime.

Tax-Loss Harvesting
Are you holding an investment that has lost value since it was purchased in your taxable portfolio? Intentionally selling this investment at a lost to reduce your tax liability is called tax-loss harvesting. The capital loss realized from this transaction can be used to offset capital gains, reducing your tax liability.

Give the Gift of Cash
Do you want to give a gift of cash? In 2018, you can give a gift of cash up to $15,000 to as many different people as you want without incurring the gift tax. The $15,000 is a per-person limit, not a total limit. Gifts up to this amount—called an annual exclusion—are not reportable on your tax return. A husband and wife can each make a $15,000 gift, giving as much as $30,000 to as many people as they choose each year.

Qualified Charitable Distributions
At the end of 2015, lawmakers approved a permanent measure allowing individuals who are 70½ years old or older to make qualified charitable distributions (also known as QCDs) directly from their individual retirement accounts (IRAs) to their favorite qualified charities.

Teri Parker is a vice president for CAPTRUST Financial Advisors.

Click here for link to full article

Taking Stock In Your Divorce

In light of the changes in the tax laws and the recent roller coaster volatility in the stock market it might be prudent to talk with your financial advisor about whatever investment assets are attached to your settlement agreement. You can also get feedback and updates related to other nest eggs that are not part of any divorce settlement, which is nevera bad idea.

The division of investment assets can be gnarly and painful so people are getting creative in settling these issues through trading, and exchanging their respective interestsin a mutually agreeable fashion. So identifying and getting a valuation, along with guidance, about your asset options will only aid you in making any changes before the December 31St deadline.

I’ve included some tips from veterans in this field that echo ideas that we’ve heard in our discussions at PeaceTalks with our financial associates.

Splitting Retirement Accounts

To understand the value of a retirement account, you need to know how withdrawals will be taxed. In general, there are 2 main types of retirement accounts: traditional and Roth.

In a traditional account, contributions are made before taxes—or you get a tax deduction for the amount contributed if it has already been taxed. Contributions to a Roth account are made after taxes are paid but the benefit is that withdrawals of earnings and contributions in retirement are not taxed.1

Bottom line: $100,000 currently in a Roth is worth more than $100,000 currently in a traditional retirement account simply because of the different tax treatments in each type of account.

Taxable Investment Accounts

When it comes to taxable investments, it’s not about the value you see on your statement, but what you get to keep after taxes.

In general, when dividing investments in a divorce, couples may have options: One option would be to sell investments and divvy up the proceeds. This can have tax consequences. Alternatively, you can generally split the investment holdings. For instance, if 100 shares of stock are part of the marital property to be divided in half, one party gets 50 shares and the other party gets the remaining 50 shares. The IRS allows divorcing spouses to each keep the same cost basis and holding period for an investment they already own. Cost basis is the price at which the investment was originally purchased. Holding period is important because profits from the sale of investments owned for a year or less are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate, while investments held for more than a year are taxed at lower long-term capital gains rates.

Assuming your investment has appreciated, you will end up with less than the sale price—because you have to pay taxes on any gains over the cost basis. Exactly how much will depend on your tax rate, holding period, and cost basis, which can vary for a single investment if you bought shares over time. So, if you’re dividing investments equally, it’s important that the cost basis is divided equally as well—your financial institution or Fidelity representative should be able to help with that.

Of course, other important things to think about with regard to investments are the future prospects for growth or income, your own tolerance for investment risk, your financial needs, and your timeframe for investing.

Tax Consequences of Investment Asset Allocation

In addition, periods of market volatility stand to impact capital gains and losses generated from investment assets. The former can create a tax liability (e.g. where a holding is sold for more than its purchase price), whereas generally speaking the latter results in an asset (e.g. where a stock’s sales price is less than its purchase price, thus creating an offset against present or future capital gains).

In high net worth divorce cases often involving millions of dollars of investment assets subject to substantial market gains and losses, it is important in periods of market volatility to recognize that certain holdings may carry positive or negative tax consequences to the litigants. In these circumstances, it is good practice to consult with financial advisors and accountants at even this micro level of asset allocation to ensure that assets and liabilities are being apportioned and allocated as the litigants contemplated, and to avoid an unintended result of one spouse being allocated a vastly disproportionate share of capital gains or losses.

Divorce and IRA’s – Watch Your Assets

Understanding different types of retirement assets, and the costs and taxes associated with each, when liquidated, can help you make informed decisions. Always consult with your financial and tax advisors during the decision making process especially before a liquidation.

To help ensure that you reach an agreement that is equitable to both of you, it’s important to know what you have now and understand how your agreement could impact your income, and lifestyle years after the divorce. You can’t direct the investment process for social security but you should be overseeing and getting advice about your IRA’s.

To understand their value, you need to know how withdrawals will be taxed from both traditional and Roth accounts. In a traditional account, contributions are made before taxes, so you get a tax deduction for the amount contributed if it has already been taxed. Contributions to a Roth account are made after taxes are paid but withdrawals of earnings and contributions in retirement are not taxed. We, of course, might see more changes to the tax code.

As an example, right now, $100,000 currently in a Roth account is worth more than $100,000 currently in a traditional retirement account simply because of the different tax treatments in each type of account.

This can be really complicated, especially when you have to deal with corporate 401K accounts. If this is something that needs attention in the life of your family and you need a suggestion please call the office and we’ll be happy to talk with you about some professionals we trust.

Spring Cleaning

by Stephanie Maloney

Spring Cleaning Your FinancesAs we finally are getting some much-needed rain I keep thinking about things, besides the social and political black holes, that are ripe for clean up.

With a clearer picture of your finances under the new tax laws it’s probably not a bad idea to get an overview from your advisors about all your options.

I used to talk with my brokerage clients at the end of the first quarter, especially after a turbulent year, so they could position themselves for any changes their tax advisor might suggest.

We already know the landscape has changed but we’re just learning about the effects on our individual situations.

You might very well need to talk about some adjustments with your ex-spouse about your co-parenting parenting plan in light of what is not working so well and any increased levels of stress on the kids. Worries about money have a habit of affecting all family members.

As I have noted please let me know if you think I might be able to be of help even if only for a referral to someone with a very specific area of expertise.

Also let me know if you or a friend might be interested in our Tuesday Support Group.